April 11, 2014

2013-14 Researcher of the Year and Creative Endeavor Awardee Lectures

Researcher of the Year and Creative Endeavor Awardee Lecture
Monday, April 14, 2014
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Art & Journalism Building, Room 225


The Sponsored Programs Office is pleased to invite you to attend the annual Researcher of the Year and Creative Endeavor Awardee Lecture! Each year following the announcement of the Outstanding Researcher of the Year and Outstanding Creative Endeavor of the Year,  the Sponsored Programs Office (SPO) hosts a presentation event for each recipient to lecture and discuss their work for the campus community. This year's event will by held on Monday, April 14th at the Arts & Journalism Building (Room 225) from 2 pm to 3:30 pm. 

For additional information regarding previous Researchers of the Year and Creative Endeavor Awardees, please visit the SPO website at www.bsu.edu/spo. 






Tom Holtgraves
Department of Psychological Science
2013-14 Researcher of the Year

Researching Language to Span Academic Boundaries






Matt Mullins
Department of English
2013-14 Creative Endeavor Awardee

Interactive Literature and Digital Media


April 07, 2014

The 2014 Student Symposium at Ball State University

The 19th Annual Student Symposium at Ball State University was held Tuesday, April 1, 2014. The event was held on the second floor of the L.A. Pittenget Student Center. Poster and multi-media displays were set up in the ballroom and moderated paper presentations, a new addition this year, took place in various locations on the second floor.

 The Keys/Litten/Smith awards were presented at the completion of the Symposium in Cardinal hall. These awards were established on behalf of Linda Keys, Jeffrey Litten, and Sandra Smith, who served in the Sponsored Programs Office for a combined total of thirty years. The awards recognize students for their outstanding research or creative endeavors presented at the Student Symposium. Six awards are given every year; two for outstanding displays and four for excellence in project content. Listed below are the 2014 award winners.

Display Award Winners:

Heather Daly 
Psychological Science
Psychophysiological Responses to Isolated Musical Chord Progressions 
Faculty Mentor: Don Ester
Music Education

Yi-Hsin Liu 
Natural Resources and Environmental Management
Nitroglycerin Decomposition in Soil as Affected by Presence of Co-Contaminants 
Faculty Mentor: John Pichtel
Natural Resources and Environmental Management

Content Award Winners:

Kayla Kmiecik 
Physical Education, Sport,and Exercise Science
Biomechanical Analysis of a Backward Somersault Landing and Drop Landing in Female Gymnasts Faculty Mentor: Henry Wang
Physical Education, Sport,and Exercise Science

Nolan Pachciarz 
Biology
The Effects of Dilantin on Male Fertility and Sperm Indices in Mice 
Faculty Mentor: Clare Chatot
Biology

Emily Johann 
Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise
Science Influence of Drop Height and Fatigue on Landing Mechanics in Recreationally Active Females 
Faculty Mentor: Clark Dickin
 Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science

Jamie Lau 
Biology
Comparing Five Macroinvertebrate Indices of Integrity: Are We Meeting National Water Quality Monitoring Intent?
Faculty Mentor: Thomas Lauer
Biology

February 25, 2014

Ball State Professor Studies Effects of Hypoglycemia

Contributed by Brenda Mackey 
Graduate Assistant, Research Publications
Sponsored Programs Office, Ball State University

The police pull over a driver, worried that he is drunk. He seems confused and unable to concentrate.  However, he has no alcohol in his system. What’s going on?

It turns out that this driver has diabetes and has become hypoglycemic. Bart Pederson, Associate Professor of Medical Education, explains that this is something people with diabetes deal with on a regular basis – especially those who have Type 1 diabetes, where they are taking insulin every day. “There’s a good chance of them going hypoglycemic. They give themselves too much insulin and their glucose drops too low. Some papers say this happens as much as twice a week. It has major effects on their ability to think clearly. It makes them tired, confused,” Pederson explains. “There’s definitely a need to understand this disorder better and how to treat it.”

Understanding hypoglycemia is what Pederson is working to do. While studying glycogen metabolism during his post-doctoral research, he investigated genetically engineered mice whose bodies couldn’t make glycogen. Having that resource available led Pederson to his current project, which involves studying the importance of brain glycogen in memory formation and the protection it may provide for the brain under hypoglycemic conditions. “Hypoglycemia is the major obstacle preventing the benefits associated with intensive insulin therapy in individuals with diabetes. Low glucose levels can lead to cognitive impairment and even brain damage,” he says.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) have seen the value in Pederson’s work, awarding him grants in 2008 and 2013. His current project pursues two aims. “The first aim is investigating the less severe cases, where people can’t think well,” he explains. “We’re using these mice, we give them insulin, make them hypoglycemic, and there’s different sorts of memory or learning tests we can do.”

How does one determine if a mouse is learning? One test, which Pederson calls “log rolling for mice,” measures motor learning skills. Mice are put on a rod that rotates and they try to stay on it. A normal mouse gets a little better at this every day. But a hypoglycemic mouse does not perform nearly as well. It has a harder time with coordination and learning to adjust for the rotation.

The second aim of the grant involves looking at severe conditions. “These are conditions that in humans can actually lead to coma. Brain cells are dying off because there’s not enough fuel for them to survive – they’re just deprived. And so in that case what we do is make our mice hypoglycemic and then again we compare – does it make any difference whether you have glycogen in your brain?” Pederson says. “Under these conditions where you basically can’t measure any glucose in their brains, the only fuel left would be glycogen. So you’d expect that if you don’t have any glycogen you don’t have any fuel, so more brain cells would die. And that seems to be the case from what we’ve seen so far.”

Working with students has become essential to Pederson’s research. “When I first came, I did a fair amount of things in the lab,” he says. “But now my role is mainly teaching the students the techniques and helping them to troubleshoot problems that arise, teaching them the background behind what we’re doing and the relevance.”

Immersive learning with students in research can lead to some interesting results. “I joke with them that I’m always rewriting my protocols because they come up with some way to do things wrong that I never would have thought of before!” Pederson says. “It just shows that you can’t assume things.”

Despite any hiccups the students may cause, they are essential to Pederson’s research. “If I didn’t have any students, nothing would get done! They’re the hands that do everything.”



Pederson was inspired to study diabetes because of the sheer number of people with the disease – 350 million worldwide. He was also inspired by one specific person – his grandfather, who struggled with diabetes throughout his life.

Pederson also just enjoys conducting research. “You’re getting to explore something that’s new. People haven’t been able to answer this question. You get to study it and hopefully find some answers. It’s exciting to make a new discovery.”

February 04, 2014

2014 Grantsmanship Information Session Recap

Throughout the year, the Sponsored Programs Office conducts many workshops and information sessions for students, faculty, and staff. This year, the Third Annual Grantsmanship Information Session (GIS) took place from 1:30 – 4:00 pm on Monday, February 3 in the Student Center.

Dr. David Stone, Associate Vice President for Research at Northern Illinois University presented the keynote address Research at Ball State Redefined: Empowering Faculty. A Knowledge Unit Meet & Greet was held shortly thereafter consisting of various campus centers and institutes. Ball State affiliates from various fields of study were given the opportunity to attend this networking event created to foster interdisciplinary research while exploring potential opportunities for collaboration – pivotal factors in externally funded projects. Each Knowledge Unit provided GIS attendees with ample opportunities to learn about both new and familiar subject.

Knowledge and Support Units Included:
  • Applied Archaeology Laboratories
  • Building Better Communities
  • Center for Energy Research/Education/Service
  • Center for Gifted Studies and Talent Development
  • Center for International Development
  • Center for Middletown Studies
  • Center for Peace and Conflict Studies

GIS attendees also had a chance to join one of the Concurrent Information Sessions that followed the Knowledge Unit Meet & Greet. 

Positioning New Faculty for Success in Research 
Dr. David Stone presented several research practices to help build a solid foundation for new faculty members to successfully begin their research agenda.  

Fulbright Scholar Information Session
Mr. Justin Miller, Director of Sponsored Programs introduced the Fulbright Scholar Program which sends both faculty and professionals abroad each year as they conduct research in various academic and professional fields.

Professionalize Your Approach to Grantsmanship
SPO Program Manager, Dr. Stanley Geidel discussed a professional approach to seeking external funding by examining three important roles that faculty occupy in the Academy: the roles of professor, principal investigator, and grantseeker. 

New Ways to Approach Private and Foundation Funding
Presented by Richard Dunfee, Executive Director of the Grants Resource Center and his colleague Program Advisor Richard Wellons, this presentation explored the current state of private funding while examining the trends that colleges and universities should consider when applying for grants offered by corporations and foundations. 



The Sponsored Programs Office would like to give a special thanks to our guest speakers Dr. David Stone, Dr. Richard Dunfee and Dr. Richard Wellons along with those who served in the Sponsored Programs Office who were instrumental in the success of the event.  

                                       

January 29, 2014

Request For Proposal (RFP) Tutorial

Need some tips on effectively reviewing a Request For Proposal (RFP)? Well you have come to the right place! That's exactly what the National Council of University Administrators (NCURA) brings to you in this week's edition of YouTube Tuesday. Take a few minutes to gain some helpful tips from Washington State University's Faculty Research Development Specialist Samuel Rodriguez and enhance your RFP review skills.

January 28, 2014

Third Annual Grantsmanship Information Session

Each year, the Sponsored Programs Office offers a number of Grantsmanship Information Sessions (GIS) for Ball State affiliates and this year, the third annual (GIS) will be held on Monday, February 3rd, 2014. The event will take place on the second floor of the Student Center from 1:30 - 4:00 pm.

Dr. David Stone, Associate Vice President for Research at Northern Illinois University will present a keynote address titled Research at Ball State Redefined: Empowering Faculty. A Knowledge Unit Meet & Greet that fosters interdisciplinary research and explores potential opportunities for collaboration is scheduled to follow the keynote address.

Campus Knowledge and Support Units in attendance will include:
A number of Concurrent Information Sessions are scheduled to take place at various locations throughout the Student Center:

Positioning New Faculty for Success in Research 
Dr. David Stone will present several research practices to help build a solid foundation for new faculty members to successfully begin their research agenda.  

Fulbright Scholar Information Session
Mr. Justin Miller, Director of Sponsored Programs will introduce the Fulbright Scholar Program which sends both faculty and professionals abroad each year as they conduct research in various academic and professional fields.

Professionalize Your Approach to Grantsmanship
SPO Program Manager, Dr. Stanley Geidel will discuss a professional approach to seeking external funding by examining three important roles that faculty occupy in the Academy: the roles of professor, principal investigator, and grantseeker. 

New Ways to Approach Private and Foundation Funding
This presentation will explore the current state of private funding while examining the trends that colleges and universities should consider when applying for grants offered by corporations and foundations. 

To RSVP for this event click here. For questions, please contact the Sponsored Programs Office at SPO@BSU.edu or call 5-1600. You can also join the event Facebook page!

2014 Student Symposium is Here!

It's that time of year again, registration for the 2014 Student Symposium is now open!

The Student Symposium at Ball State University offers students an opportunity to present their research and creative endeavors to the campus community. Presentations may be in the form of a poster, a creative work or a digital display. A new feature this year is the addition of moderated paper presentations.

All Ball State University students are eligible including those from Burris Laboratory and the Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities. Students from all disciplines are welcomed and encouraged to participate. Participating students must have engaged in academic activities either inside or outside the classroom and must have been advised by a Ball State faculty mentor.

The Student Symposium is a great way to gain practical and professional experience as well as learn about the broad range of opportunities available on campus. As with previous years, CASH PRIZES will also be awarded for the most outstanding poster presentations so don't miss out on your opportunity to be apart of the 2014 Student Symposium here at Ball State University.

Registration Details: 
* Deadline is Friday, February 3rd at 5 pm
* Registration is available online at www.bsu.edu/spo
Event Date: Tuesday, April 1st (1:30 pm - 5:00 pm)
Event Location: L.A. Pittenger Student Center Ballroom, 2nd Floor
Contact Information: Ms. Jessie Roark at SPO.BSU@gmail.com or (765) 285-5003

The Student Symposium at Ball State University social media outlets:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/studentsymposiumatbsu
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BSU_SPO ‐‐ Hashtag #ssbsu14


December 11, 2013

Lilly Endowment's $63 Million Initiative To Promote Opportunities Through Educational Collaboration

The Lilly Endowment will announce Thursday (December 12, 2013) $62.7 million in grants to 39 Indiana colleges and universities to combat brain drain among graduates. As the third round of grants over the past decade, this is a part of what the endowment calls its Initiative to Promote Opportunities Through Educational Collaboration.

Compared with a national rate of 30 percent, only 25 percent of Hoosiers between the ages of 25 and 64 obtain at least a bachelor’s degree, according to Census data. While Indiana does better than most states at holding on to its college graduates, its ability to attract educated adults is where it lags behind the competition according to census data. These findings are what led Mike Hicks of Ball State University to question the endowment’s brain-drain grants and other similarly focused areas. “The problem lies not in how many people we’re educating or how we’re educating them, but in having places that they want to live,” said Hicks in a September interview.

The endowment determined the size of its grants based on enrollment numbers at each educational institution. The largest grants, $5 million each, were awarded to Indiana University and Purdue University. Ivy Tech Community College will receive $4.9 million while $3 million each will go to the University of Notre Dame, Ball State University, Indiana State University, Indiana Wesleyan University, the University of Southern Indiana and Vincennes University. The majority of remaining schools will be awarded roughly $1 million each.

Nearly all the colleges will use the money to expand internships and experiential learning opportunities for students as well as expand career development programs, says the endowment. “These activities have the potential to [significantly] increase the number of Indiana college graduates who find satisfying opportunities in the state,” said Lilly Endowment’s vice president for education Sara Cobb.

Please read Indianapolis Business Journal article by J.K. Wall to learn additional information regarding this Lilly Endowment Initiative or visit the communications page of Lilly Endowment Inc. website.

IAC Individual Artist Program Workshops and Deadline

In December and January the Indiana Arts Commission will be hosting workshops regarding the Individual Artist Program. The deadline for this program is February 7th, 2014 for projects focused on "crafts, design, media, photography, visual arts, and folk arts related to these disciplines. The workshops offer an opportunity to get your questions answered and to familiarize yourself with this grant program. These are the currently confirmed workshop dates, but more may be added at a later time. Please visit the Indiana Arts Commission workshop page for more information.

•Date: December 14, 2013
Time: 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. EST
Location: Artlink, Auer Center for Arts and Culture, 300 E Main St., Fort Wayne, IN 46802

•Date: January 9, 2014
Time: 4:30-6:30 p.m. EST
Location: Arts Illiana, 23 N Sixth Street, Terre Haute, IN 47807

•Date: January 7, 2014
Time: 5:30-7:30 p.m. EST
Location: Indianapolis Public Library – College Avenue Branch, 4180 N College Ave, Indianapolis, IN 46205

•Date: January 4, 2014
Time: 1:00-3:00 p.m. EST
Location: Clarksville Town Hall, 2000 Broadway St., Clarksville, IN 47129

November 26, 2013

Jim Connolly Presents "Middletown"

Contributed by Brenda Mackey 
Graduate Assistant, Research Publications
Sponsored Programs Office, Ball State University

Anyone familiar with Muncie’s nickname “Middletown” has heard that our town is emblematic of the American experience. The original Middletown studies, conducted in the 1920s, analyzed Muncie’s transition from a farming town to an industrial town. Since the close of the Borg Warner plant in 2009, Muncie has been experiencing another shift, deindustrializing and moving to a newly globalizing economy.

Prof. Jim Connolly, director of the Center for Middletown Studies and professor of history, spent the Spring 2013 semester in Germany as a guest professor. When he presented about Middletown, the groups of German academics most often wanted to know about the local response in Muncie to the studies. The response of Muncie residents varied from enthusiasm (“We represent America!”) to resentment (“I don’t want to be ‘average.’”). His German audiences told Connolly that the Middletown studies confirmed American stereotypes: white, protestant, individualistic and ignoring race. They also expressed surprise that the American government would allow a decline like the one Muncie is now experiencing to happen.


Muncie changed dramatically between 1890 and 1925, but not in the cultural sense. While technology changed daily life, the philosophy of the people of Muncie remained the same, placing high value on individualism, limited government and religion. Whether those values will persist through Muncie’s current transition remains to be seen.